"Kenya is the original home of the safari. And it still ranks high among Africa’s most alluring wildlife destinations. Hemmed in by the Indian Ocean beaches of the Swahili Coast, overlooked by the snow-capped peaks of Mount Kenya and Kilimanjaro, and bisected by the mile-deep Great Rift Valley, Kenya is a land of exceptional geographic diversity and scenic beauty. But its biggest drawcard is undoubtedly the diverse megafauna protected in its world-famous wildlife reserves. ”

- Philip Briggs

Kenya

Kenya’s main safari circuit includes some of Africa’s most alluring wildlife reserves.

There is dust-blown Amboseli, where peaceable herds of tuskers march majestically below the iconic outline of Kilimanjaro. There are Lakes Nakuru and Bogoria, edges tinged pink by up to two million flamingos. There are the superlative private ‘Big Five’ reserves of Laikipia, whose highland plains are grazed by prehistoric-looking rhinos and which, together with the lower-lying Samburu-Buffalo Springs-Shaba complex of reserves, provide refuge to localised dry-country specialists such as the striking Grevy’s zebra, the handsome reticulated giraffe and the stretch-necked gerenuk antelope.

And there is also, of course, the peerless Masaai Mara, home to truly incredible concentrations of lions and other predators, but also the seasonal setting for the world’s greatest wildlife spectacle, as millions of wildebeest hurtle across the Mara River from the neighbouring Serengeti every August.

Kenya is dotted with lesser-known safari destinations suited to those who want to explore off the beaten track. Try the scorched volcanic landscapes of Tsavo West and neighbouring Chyulu Hills, the incomprehensibly vast red-earth plains of Tsavo East, the lush savannah and jungle-lined streams of Meru, more intimate and low-key gems such as coastal Shimba Hills and hiker-friendly Hell’s Gate, or one of the hide-like hotels set in the montane forests of Mount Kenya and the Aberdares.

Kenya boasts a wonderful 500km Indian Ocean coastline. All fine white sand and swaying palms, beach resorts such as Diani, Malindi and Watamu are ideal for those seeking to append a few days of seaside chill-out to a busy safari, offering excellent amenities, but still very uncrowded by global standards. The Swahili Coast also offers much to more active travellers: offshore reefs whose kaleidoscopic array of colourful fish will delightful snorkelers and divers, mysterious mediaeval ruins set in dense tropical jungles, and characterful centuries-old ports such as Mombasa’s ‘old town’ and the delightfully labyrinthine island backwater of Lamu.

When to go

Find out when is best to visit

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DRY SEASON

A brief drier interlude before the more intense ‘long rains’ in March, April and May.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

DRY SEASON

A brief drier interlude before the more intense ‘long rains’ in March, April and May.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

TRANSITION FROM DRY TO WET SEASON

The exact start of the rains is always a little uncertain, March can start well but it is worth bearing in mind that the weather will become more unpredictable as the month progresses.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

WET SEASON - 'LONG RAINS'

The exact start and end of the rains are always a little uncertain, but generally, this period is the wettest time of the year, making travel to and from lodges potentially a little tricky at times. This wet season is also often characterised by overcast skies and consecutive days of rain.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

WET SEASON - 'LONG RAINS'

The exact start and end of the rains are always a little uncertain, but generally, this period is the wettest time of the year, making travel to and from lodges potentially a little tricky at times. This wet season is also often characterised by overcast skies and consecutive days of rain.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

TRANSITION FROM WET TO DRY SEASON

By June the country should generally have moved into the dry season, which marks a more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. The weather can however still be a little unpredictable, especially at the beginning of the month.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

DRY SEASON

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

DRY SEASON

A more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. All in all the perfect time to visit the vast majority of the country.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

DRY SEASON

A more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. All in all the perfect time to visit the vast majority of the country.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

DRY SEASON

A more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. All in all the perfect time to visit the vast majority of the country.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

WET SEASON - 'SHORT RAINS'

A rather unpredictable time of the year with the occasional heavy shower or thunderstorm, but usually plenty of sunshine in between. While technically the wet season the rains are not as intense during this period as the ‘long rains’, it can therefore still be a great time to visit.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

WET SEASON - 'SHORT RAINS'

A rather unpredictable time of the year with the occasional heavy shower or thunderstorm, but usually plenty of sunshine in between. While technically the wet season the rains are not as intense during this period as the ‘long rains’, it can therefore still be a great time to visit.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Kenya, this, therefore, has a corresponding effect on both temperatures as well as rainfall. It is incredible just how climatically varied a country Kenya is for its size.

In general daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So, if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Kenya, the first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are of course exceptions to this, such as the central highlands which have very high rainfall amounts throughout the year, arid regions such as Meru which have just one distinct wet season and coastal areas which have a more tropical oceanic climate.

The best time for a safari in Kenya is very much defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Many parks are good all year round, although you will find that one’s chances of a good sighting improve during the drier months of the year. If however, you are seeking a more wilderness experience, the best birdlife or simply better prices it the wetter month may, in fact, be a better time to visit.

Amboseli National Park

Amboseli National Park

Home to some of Africa’s biggest elephants, Amboseli’s acacia woodland, vegetated plains and spring-fed marshes also supports an abundance of wildebeest, zebra, gazelle, giraffe and buffalo. A scenic highlight is the snow-capped dome of Kilimanjaro, towering a full 5km above the southern horizon.

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Chyulu Hills National Park

Chyulu Hills National Park

One of Kenya’s newest and lesser-known national parks, Chyulu Hills is an extension of Tsavo West, and protects a vital area of volcanically formed hills. Wildlife volumes are lower here, and roads are sparse, but it's great for adventurous hikers, who can take guided walks with an armed ranger.

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Laikipia Plateau

Laikipia Plateau

Northern Kenya’s Laikipia Plateau is a conservation success story. During the colonial era, most of the area was released to livestock ranches, but it has since been turned into a range of private and community-owned sanctuaries. It is the country’s second-largest conservancy after Tsavo.

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Lamu Archipelago

Lamu Archipelago

Lamu is a characterful port on the East African coast. This UNESCO World Heritage Site has a cultural integrity unmatched by any other Swahili settlement. A cluster of islands with pristine coral reefs are serviced by a handful of isolated lodges that embody the concept of barefoot luxury.

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Maasai Mara

Maasai Mara

Kenya’s most famous wildlife reserve, the Masaai Mara seldom disappoints. Home to an unrivalled amount of plains wildlife, it offers a good chance of spotting all the Big Five. Between August and October, view the million-strong wildebeest migration that streams across the Mara River from Tanzania.

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Meru National Park

Meru National Park

The former stomping ground of Joy and George Adamson of Born Free fame, this national park offers a classic wilderness experience. With lush savannah and jungle-lined streams, it supports all the Big Five, along with other mammal and bird species associated with the semi-arid plains to its north.

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Mombasa & Diani Beach

Mombasa & Diani Beach

Mombasa is the busiest port in East Africa and Kenya’s second-largest city. Set on a small island with an atmospheric Old Town, Mombasa is also the gateway to gorgeous Diani Beach which offers swimming, other marine activities, and some unexpectedly good opportunities for wildlife viewing.

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Mount Kenya and the Aberdares

Mount Kenya and the Aberdares

Capping the central highlands north of Nairobi are two mountains: Mount Kenya, whose summit is the second-highest in Africa, and the Aberdare Range. Both are protected in parks whose flora and fauna are best explored by spending a night at one of the exclusive hotels overlooking the waterholes.

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Nairobi

Nairobi

The most important air gateway to East Africa, Kenya’s sprawling highland capital has a rather charmless city centre, but the leafy suburbs are studded with worthwhile museums and animal refuges, most notably the underrated Nairobi National Park - a genuine safari destination in its own right.

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Nakuru & the Southern Rift Valley Lakes

Nakuru & the Southern Rift Valley Lakes

Hemmed in by high cliffs, the Rift Valley and its lakes are a rewarding travel destination. Lake Nakuru National Park offers a chance of seeing both black and white rhino, flamingoes flocking to Lake Bogoria, and Hell’s Gate - the last place where you can walk unguided through big game country.

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Samburu, Buffalo Springs & Shaba National Reserves

Samburu, Buffalo Springs & Shaba National Reserves

Protecting a combined 440km2, this trio of reserves flanks the perennial Ewaso Nyiro River as it flows through the badlands north of Mount Kenya. It’s a mixed bag in Big Five terms, but the main attraction is the opportunity for a variation on familiar safari mammals and birds.

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Tsavo West & East National Parks

Tsavo West & East National Parks

Collectively Kenya’s largest protected area, Tsavo parks support Kenya’s largest elephant population, and form an important stronghold for the rest of the Big Five. Game viewing is slower than in the the Masaai Mara and Amboseli, but possesses a more untrammelled feel than most safari destinations.

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Watamu & Malindi Coastline

Watamu & Malindi Coastline

The medieval port of Malindi and nearby resort village of Watamu offer a fine range of activities on the Kenyan coast. The beaches are delightful, while offshore coral formations harbour 300-plus species of reef fish, and jungle-bound Gedi ranks as the country’s most atmospheric historical site.

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What People Say

★★★★★
  • The personalised service provided was far beyond my expectations. A three week trip visiting four countries in Africa, multiple game reserves, wineries and much, much more was flawless. While a close encounter with a leopard and her cubs…

    Chris Hutchens

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  • We got in touch after hearing about Hide & Seek from a friend. Have to say hats off to Jamie, he was so patient throughout, even through our indecisiveness! Ultimately we ended up with the most incredible holiday of our lives. Thank you again, we will be back!!

    Amy Williams

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  • Thank you for arranging our Safari holiday in Kenya and Tanzania for us. It was to celebrate our 40th. Wedding anniversary which was on July 1st. 2018, and through your arrangements, we have had a holiday that we will never forget...

    Margaret and Stephen

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  • Thanks so much for a truly unforgettable once in a life time holiday. Hopefully we will be in touch again soon!

    Nick and Sarah

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  • Spot on in terms of itinerary . We not disappointed by any of the suggestions and had the best holiday ever! Thank you!

    David Glen

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  • Jamie was very helpful throughout the booking process and recommended the perfect holiday. There was nothing we would change having now been out to Tanzania. I would highly recommend Hide & Seek to friends and relatives.

    Amit Roy

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  • Jamie was excellent. Once I described what we wanted I knew he would come up with the business. ..and he did!!! 5 stars

    Jessica Harvard

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  • We spoke to numerous travel agents over the period we looked at booking our honeymoon and only hide and seek gave me the confidence I was looking for. Really pleased with our decision.

    Glen and Amanda Crawford

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  • Hide and seek dealt with our last minute travel plans extremely well. Obviously, our accommodations shifted as availability diminished but ultimately they came up with a vacation that we will never forget.

    Bob & Jen

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