"Tanzania is a superlative safari destination. Home to the world-famous Serengeti Plains and Ngorongoro Crater, this ecologically-savvy East African nation incorporates a network of national parks and other protected areas that account for a quarter of its surface area and harbour 20 percent of Africa’s big game. As politically stable as it is culturally diverse, Tanzania is also graced by such alluring landmarks as snow-capped Kilimanjaro and the sumptuous ‘spice island’ of Zanzibar. ”

- Philip Briggs

Tanzania

Tanzania boasts three distinct safari circuits, each a destination in its own right.

The showstoppers along Tanzania’s ‘northern safari circuit’ are the world-famous Serengeti National Park and the Eden-esque Ngorongoro Crater. As the stomping ground of a two-million strong wildebeest migration and home to Africa’s largest concentration of lions and other large predators, Serengeti/Ngorongoro forms the ideal first-time safari destination, offering a great chance of spotting all the Big Five in magnificently scenic surrounds. Yet this phenomenal circuit also incorporates three other perennially popular national parks: Lake Manyara, Tarangire and Arusha.

Far quieter in terms of tourist traffic, the ‘southern safari circuit’ is centred upon the 20,220km2 Ruaha and 45,000km2 Selous – respectively Tanzania’s largest national park and Africa’s largest game reserve. Game densities are not as high as in the north, but they are still thoroughly impressive, and the overall feel of the southern circuit is far wilder than its northern counterparts, with Selous offering the added bonus of boat safaris and guided walks.

Even more remote and off-the-beaten-track is the ‘western safari circuit’. Here, the little-visited but wildlife-rich savanna of Katavi National Park must surely rank as East Africa’s most untrammelled safari destination. By contrast, the lushly vegetated slopes of Mahale Mountains offering the opportunity to stretch one’s legs in search of its habituated chimpanzees and other forest wildlife.

Safaris aside, Tanzania is a fine hiking destination. Most popular is the five- to seven-day ascent to of snow-capped Kilimanjaro; a less time-consuming leftfield alternative is the overnight ascent of volcanic Ol Doinyo Lengai.

For those seeking a bush-and-beach combination, Tanzania’s tropical Indian Ocean is hard to beat. The ‘spice island’ of Zanzibar, with its sumptuous beaches and atmospheric old Stone Town, tends to hog the limelight, but the 800km mainland coastline offers plenty of opportunities to escape the crowds, as do the pretty islands of Pemba and Mafia.

When to go

Find out when is best to visit

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DRY SEASON

A brief drier interlude before the more intense ‘long rains’ in March, April and May.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

DRY SEASON

A brief drier interlude before the more intense ‘long rains’ in March, April and May.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

DRY TO WET SEASON TRANSITION

The exact start and end of the rains are always a little uncertain, but generally, this period is the wettest time of the year, making travel to and from lodges potentially a little tricky at times. This wet season is also often characterised by overcast skies and consecutive days of rain.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

WET SEASON - 'LONG RAINS'

Often characterised by overcast skies and consecutive days of rain this period is the wettest time of the year, making travel to and from lodges potentially a little tricky at times.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

WET SEASON - 'LONG RAINS'

Often characterised by overcast skies and consecutive days of rain this period is the wettest time of the year, making travel to and from lodges potentially a little tricky at times.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

DRY SEASON

A more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. All in all the perfect time to visit the vast majority of the country.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

DRY SEASON

A more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. All in all the perfect time to visit the vast majority of the country.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

DRY SEASON

A more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. All in all the perfect time to visit the vast majority of the country.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

DRY SEASON

A more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. All in all the perfect time to visit the vast majority of the country.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

DRY SEASON

A more stable and predictable time of the year, usually with clear skies. All in all the perfect time to visit the vast majority of the country.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

WET SEASON - 'SHORT RAINS'

A rather unpredictable time of the year with the occasional heavy shower or thunderstorm, but usually plenty of sunshine in between. While technically the wet season the rains are not as intense during this period as the ‘long rains’, it can therefore still be a great time to visit.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

DRY SEASON - 'SHORT RAINS'

A rather unpredictable time of the year with the occasional heavy shower or thunderstorm, but usually plenty of sunshine in between. While technically the wet season the rains are not as intense during this period as the ‘long rains’, it can therefore still be a great time to visit.

Its location so close to the equator means that temperatures throughout the year are very consistent, the variable in play is often altitude, which varies greatly across Tanzania. With perhaps the exception of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area daytime temperatures are warm to hot throughout the year, yet mornings can be surprisingly cool. So if you intend to visit an inland safari region, we could always recommend bringing a warm fleece.

There are two wet seasons in Tanzania. The first known as the long rains take place between March and May, the second wet season is known as the short rains which also tend to be a little less intense, these take place between November and December. There are some exceptions to this, such as the Southern and Western safari regions which tend to have a more continuous wet season from November through to May.

The best time for a safari in Tanzania ultimately is defined by the type of experience you are seeking. Generally, the Northern Circuit parks (The Serengeti, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Lake Manyara) are good all year round, but with subtle variations. Tarangire is the exception in the Northern Circuit which along with the Southern (Selous and Ruaha) and Western (Katavi and Mahale) are however generally at their best during the drier times of the year. Sadaani is a little different, at it's best when the plains are very well watered, and thus ideally visited just after the rains.

Coastal and Island destinations are generally at their very best during the dry season when the weather is a little more stable and sunnier.

Arusha and Arusha National Park

Arusha and Arusha National Park

The town of Arusha, Tanzania's safari capital, is more of a tourist funnel than a destination spot, but the national park, less than an hour’s drive away offers game drives, canoeing on bird-rich lakes, or explorations of volcanic craters - all within eyeshot of the snow-capped peak of Kilimanjaro.

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Dar es Salaam

Dar es Salaam

Tanzania’s largest city and most important commercial hub, the port of Dar es Salaam (derived from a Swahili phrase meaning ‘Haven of Peace’) incorporates some fascinating historic buildings, notable the Old Boma built by the Sultan of Zanzibar in 1867 and a beautiful Bavarian-st

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Katavi National Park

Katavi National Park

An untrammelled and remote safari destination, Katavi is Tanzania’s third largest national park. Close to Mahale Mountains in the Western Rift Valley, it's possibly the best place to spot lions on the continent. Katavi is also home to masses of elephant, buffalo and hippo.

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Lake Manyara National Park

Lake Manyara National Park

A compact reserve on Tanzania’s northern safari circuit, Manyara has a diversity of habitats, from open water and grassy floodplains to acacia thickets and lush forests. It is a scenic park, set below the cliffs of the Rift Valley escarpment, and full of the famous 'tree-climbing lions of Manyara'.

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Lake Natron and Ol Doinyo Lengai

Lake Natron and Ol Doinyo Lengai

Among the most primal and starkly beautiful of Rift Valley landscapes, Lake Natron is a long sliver of ultra-alkaline water and the only known breeding site for East Africa’s several million flamingoes. The lake is enclosed by white salt flats studded with black volcanic protrusions, and overlooked

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Mafia Archipelago

Mafia Archipelago

Dominated by the large island for which it is named, the Mafia archipelago is protected in a marine park that offers probably the finest diving, snorkelling and game fishing in all of Tanzania.

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Mahale Mountains National Park

Mahale Mountains National Park

One of Africa’s top chimpanzee-tracking destinations, Mahale Mountains is also wonderfully scenic, evoking a remote beach idyll. Sprawled across a mountain within the Rift Valley, it rises from the shores of Lake Tanganyika - the world’s longest freshwater body, and reputedly least polluted.

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Mount Kilimanjaro

Mount Kilimanjaro

The world’s tallest free-standing mountain, Kilimanjaro towers 5km above the dusty plains below. It is one of East Africa’s most iconic and breathtaking sights. For a more immersive experience, the round-trip hike to the glacial peak is regarded by many to be a highlight of their time in Tanzania.

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Ngorongoro Crater and Conservation Area

Ngorongoro Crater and Conservation Area

This 8,292km2 eastern annex to the Serengeti protects a vast area of plains rising to meet the Ngorongoro Highlands in the west. Its centre piece is the Ngorongoro Crater, not only the world’s largest intact volcanic caldera, but also a sanctuary supporting dense populations of all the Big Five.

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Pemba Island

Pemba Island

The larger of the two main islands that comprise the Zanzibar Archipelago, Pemba lacks the historical pedigree of its more celebrated neighbour, but its beach resorts are no less rewarding, and attract far lower tourist volumes.

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Ruaha National Park

Ruaha National Park

Protecting 20,220km2 of woodland, boulder-strewn ridges, sandy watercourses and ancient baobabs, Ruaha is the largest national park in Tanzania, and one of the most biodiverse. With a large population of big cats and other carnivores, it's also known for its elephants birdlife, and antelope.

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Rubondo Island National Park

Rubondo Island National Park

Lapped by the cool waters of Lake Victoria - Africa’s largest freshwater body - this remote national park protects a little-visited island whose forested interior and swampy shores protect a host of rare wildlife, including semi-habituated chimpanzees.

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Saadani National Park

Saadani National Park

Gracing the mainland coast opposite Zanzibar, Saadani is the one place in East Africa where lions and elephants might be observed strolling along an idyllic palm-lined beach. It is also a prime spot for birdwatching, game drives, guided walks and boat trips on the jungle-fringed Wami River.

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Selous Game Reserve

Selous Game Reserve

Africa’s largest game reserve is dominated by the Rufiji River as it flows through a labyrinth of lakes, swampy islets and streams inhabited by hippo, elephant and giraffe. Paired with boat safaris and guided walks, Selous makes for a uniquely rounded and multi-dimensional safari experience.

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Tanzania Mainland Coast

Tanzania Mainland Coast

Although Zanzibar is the most established goal for a post-safari beach break, the long Indian Ocean coastline of the Tanzanian mainland is lined with fine reef-protected swimming beaches and studded with historic Swahili ports.

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Tarangire National Park

Tarangire National Park

Named after the Tarangire river, Tarangire National Park protects a vast tract of acacia savanna studded with baobab trees and sculpted termite mounds. It's famed for its dense elephant population, a healthy numbers of lion and leopard, and numerous bird species making it a birdwatchers haven.

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The Serengeti

The Serengeti

The Serengeti is Africa’s most famous safari destination, incorporating conservancies such as the Serengeti National Park and exclusive Singita Grumeti Reserve. It's also the arena for a thrilling natural phenomena: an annual migration of some two million wildebeest and zebra.

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Zanzibar

Zanzibar

The enchanting island of Zanzibar is lined with idyllic beaches and coral reefs swirling with fish. A post-safari beach retreat, the island also has a history of maritime trade and Swahili culture reflected in the labyrinthine alleys of Stone Town, and its scattering of mosques and ruined palaces.

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Explore our sample itineraries for a little inspiration

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